CONSENT AGENDA REQUEST

Sponsor:

 Board of Supervisors Meeting Date:

 

Bill Downey, Scott District Supervisor

 

August 16, 2004

Staff Lead:

Department:

 

Frederick P.D. Carr, Director

 

Community Development

Topic:

 

A Resolution to the Virginia Board of Historic Resources and the National Park Service Supporting the Inclusion of Rectortown on the Virginia Landmarks and National Registers

 

Topic Description:

 

On July 26, 2004, the Virginia Department of Historic Resources conducted an evening public hearing and informational meeting regarding the merits of including the Rectortown on the Virginia Landmarks Register and the National Register of Historic Places. This hearing was conducted in the Marshall Community Center.  Property owners and community representatives received a briefing from the County’s architectural consultant, Maral Kalbian, and responded positively to her report. 

 

Requested Action of the Board of Supervisors:

Consider adoption of the attached resolution.

Financial Impact Analysis:

None.

 

Summary Staff Report:

 

The County has 21 historic areas that are of state and national significance.  The Final Report for Survey Update of Historic Properties in Fauquier County, Virginia (March 20, 2002) recommended all be submitted for designation on the Virginia Landmarks and National Register of Historic Places. 

 

As a result of the referenced report, the County has pursued this major project with both Board of Supervisors and private contributions.  In FY 2004, County completed detailed surveys which resulted in the Settlements of Ashville and Morgantown and the Villages of Delaplane and New Baltimore being placed on the Virginia Landmarks and the National Register of Historic Places.

 

The survey work and requisite public hearing for the Village of Rectortown has been completed. The Property owners and community representatives received a briefing on July 26, 2004 from the County’s architectural consultant, Maral Kalbian, and responded positively to her report.  The Virginia Department of Historic Resources will present these findings to the Commonwealth Board of Historic Resources in September 2004.

 

The Village of Rectortown, located four miles north of Marshall, was established by an act of the Virginia Assembly in 1772 on land owned by John Rector.  It is considered the oldest town in Fauquier County.

 

The designated historic district encompasses 155 acres with the oldest resources centered near the crossroads of Rectortown Road and Maidstone Road.  The majority of significant structures in the village are dwellings, but also included are two churches, a school, an Odd Fellows hall, a post office, multiple commercial buildings and several cemeteries.

 

Rectortown was significant during the Civil War since it was Colonel John S. Mosby’s unofficial headquarters and Old Rector’s Store was used as a prison for captured federal troops.  The village was also the headquarters of Union General George McClellan in November 1862 when he received word from President Lincoln that he was being relieved from his post.

 

Rectortown, due to its location along major local arteries, is still very vibrant.  The village retains visual cohesiveness and an identity that is centered on the churches in the community.  The historic resources that make up the Rectortown Historic District represent the town from the late 18th century to mid-20th century.  As Maral Kalbian states, “It maintains a remarkable degree of architectural integrity and is surrounded by unspoiled open farmland.”

Identify any other Departments, Organizations or Individuals that would be affected by this request:

Property owners.

 


 

RESOLUTION

 

A Resolution to the Virginia Board of Historic Resources and the National Park Service Supporting the Inclusion of RECTORTOWN on the Virginia Landmarks and National Registers

 

WHEREAS, Rectortown was established by an act of the Virginia Assembly in 1772 on land owned by John Rector; and

 

WHEREAS, 54 properties in the Rectortown Historic District illustrate the community’s development over a period of more than two hundred years; and

 

WHEREAS, the village still retains visual cohesiveness and an identity that is centered on the churhes in the community; and 

 

WHEREAS, the building and associated resources that make up the Rectortown Historic District represent the town from the late 18th century to the mid-20th century and maintains a remarkable degree of architectural integrity surrounded by unspoiled, open farmland; now, therefore, be it

 

RESOLVED by the Fauquier County Board of Supervisors this 16th day of August 2004, That the Board hereby supports and encourages the Virginia Board of Historic Resources to include the Rectortown Historic District, located in the Scott Magisterial District, in the Virginia Landmarks Register; and, be it

 

RESOLVED FINALLY, That the Virginia Board of Historic Resources recommends to the National Park Service, due to the established and unique history and National significance of Rectortown, that this community be enrolled in the National Register of Historic Places.