The types of Soil Maps utilized in the land development process in Fauquier County include the following. 

The 1956 Fauquier County Soil Survey

This survey was produced by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Soil Conservation Service (now Natural Resources Conservation Service) in cooperation with the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station. These maps were 1942-1944 by seven soil scientists walking over the landscapes, boring auger holes where different soils were anticipated and drawing the soil lines on 1937 aerial photos which were at a scale of 1 inch on the map equals 1,320 feet on the ground but was published as a planimetric map at a scale of 1 inch = 1,760 feet. The scales provides a minimum delineation size of approximately 2.5 acres, with the typical delineation of 10 to 100 acres. The maps were produced primarily for agricultural use and great emphasis was placed on surface features that affected tillage. Archived soil map unit information is available on the USDA Web Soil Survey and archived copies of the soil maps are available in the Department of Community Development. While of historical value, the 1956 Survey is no longer used for land planning purposes.

The 2007 Fauquier County Soil Survey

This survey is is an updated soil map produced to National Cooperative Soil Survey standards by the Fauquier County Soil Scientist’s Office in cooperation with the USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service. The maps were evaluated using a random sampling system. The County soil scientist would bore holes at these points, collecting soil and site data. It is the official soil survey for Fauquier County. The soil maps and interpretive information are available on the USDA Web Soil Survey and from the County Soil Scientist. The soil maps are also available from the GIS Department as two separate layers – the soil map layer and the soil drainage layer. The original scale is 1 inch on the map equals 1000 feet on the ground, with a minimum delineation size of 0.2 acre, a maximum of 1302 acres and typical delineations of 5 to 12 acres. The 2007 Fauquier County Soil Survey is used as the soil information in some Rezoning and Special Exceptions submissions, as well as in cases where the requirement for more specific soil information is waived.

The Type 1 Soil Report

This detailed soil map and report is produced for fee by the County Soil Scientist. The 2007 County Soil Survey and the latest aerial photography and topographic maps are used as the base map, but extensive field work is used to verify the information and add detail. The map scale is 1 inch on the map equals 400 feet on the ground, with a minimum delineation size of 0.002 acres, a maximum of 71 acres and typical delineations of 0.4 to 2 acres. This map is solely a product of Fauquier County and is not part of the National Cooperative Soil Survey. It is used where more detailed soil information is beneficial, including Preliminary Subdivision Plans, Major Site Plans and some Rezoning submissions. The service is also available to any landowner who desired better soil information for their property.

The Preliminary Soil Report

This Report has characteristics similar to the Type 1 Soil Report but it is prepared by a private Professional Soil Scientist rather than the County Soil Scientist. It must be field reviewed and approved by the County Soil Scientist before it can be used as the soil information in land development plans.  An application for Preliminary Soil Report review and fee are required. Like the Type 1 Soil Report, the Preliminary Soil Report is used in applications where more detailed soil information is beneficial, including Preliminary Subdivision Plans, Major Site Plans and some Rezoning submissions.

The Final Soil Report

This Report is a refinement of a Type 1 Soil Report or Preliminary Soil Report. It is prepared by a private Professional Soil Scientist. The Professional Soil Scientist adjusts the soil map to match the subdivision plan base map and adds any additional detail that can be shown based on the larger scale of the subdivision plan.  It is required for Subdivision Construction Plans. It can be used as the soil information for any other submission since it provides the best available soil information.

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